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Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more

Research in Action is a weekly podcast about topics and issues related to research in higher education from experts across a range of disciplines. Episodes are posted weekly and include guest interviews and occasional solo episodes. Guests are from a range of higher education institutions and share their expertise on qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods as well as their personal experiences as researchers; research and writing practices; organizational and productivity strategies; and much more. Some weeks, bonus content is also posted. Research in Action is hosted by Dr. Katie Linder, the research director for Oregon State University Ecampus. Show notes with information regarding topics discussed in each episode, as well as the transcript and instructor guide for each episode, can be found at the Research in Action website at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/podcast. The Research in Action podcast is a resource funded by Oregon State University Ecampus – ranked one of the nation’s best providers of online education with more than 40 degree programs and over 1,000 classes online. Learn more about Ecampus by visiting ecampus.oregonstate.edu. This podcast is produced by the Ecampus Multimedia team.
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Research in Action | A podcast for faculty & higher education professionals on research design, methods, productivity & more
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Now displaying: February, 2017
Feb 24, 2017

On this episode, I am joined by Dr. Laurie Juranek, an Assistant Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. Dr. Juranek studies what the chemistry of seawater tells us about life and death in the ocean. Her research takes her from the warm, aquamarine waters off of Hawaii to the ice-covered Arctic Ocean. When not doing science, she enjoys vegetable gardening, cooking, and weightlifting.

Show Notes

Segment 1: Life and Death in the Ocean [00:00-10:09]

In this first segment, Laurie describes the research questions she explores in her study of life and death in the ocean.

Segment 2: Logistics of Researching in the Field [10:10-22:17]

In segment two, Laurie shares some of the logistics of her research in the arctic.

Segment 3: Broader Impacts of Researching in the Arctic [22:18-33:25]

In segment three, Laurie discusses some of the ways she frames the broader impacts of her research, particularly for grant applications.

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 20, 2017

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-06:39]: The Four Aces for Projecting Confidence

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 20, 2017

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-02:48]: Tips for Presenting to Non-scientists

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 20, 2017

On this episode, I am joined by Michael Alley. Holding a master of science in electrical engineering and a master of fine arts in writing, Michael Alley is an associate professor of engineering communication at Penn State.  He is the author of The Craft of Scientific Presentations (Springer, 2013), which has been translated into Japanese and Chinese. Over the past decade, he has taught presentations to scientists and engineers on four continents, in sixteen countries, and at more than 150 institutions. He has presented at Google, MIT, Harvard Medical School, Texas Instruments, Simula Research Laboratory (Norway), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and the European Space Organization in the high desert of Chile. Alley’s websites on presentations are top Google listings for the topics of "engineering presentations" and "scientific presentations".

Transcript (.docx)

Show Notes

Would you like to incorporate this episode of "Research in Action" into your course? Download the Episode 47 Instructor Guide (.docx) or visit our Podcast Instructor Guides page to find additional information and past episode guides.

Segment 1: Best Practices for Scientific Presentations [00:00-09:35]

In this first segment, Michael shares some of what he has learned about making effective research presentations.

Segment 2: Investigations on Confidence in Speaking [09:36-16:25]

In segment two, Michael discusses how researchers can be more confident as presenters.

Segment 3: Rethinking the Way We Use PowerPoint [16:26-30:55]

In segment three, Michael shares some of his thoughts on PowerPoint and best practices for using the tool.

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-02:48]: Tips for Presenting to Non-scientists

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-06:39]: The Four Aces for Projecting Confidence

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 13, 2017

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-04:26]: Expanding Design-based Research into Higher Education

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 13, 2017

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:10]: Basic vs. Applied Research

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 13, 2017

On this episode, I am joined by Dr. Sam Johnston, a research scientist with The Center for Applied Special Technology, or CAST. With support of the Gates Foundation’s Open Professionals Education Network, she recently led the development of UDL On Campus—a collection of online resources to aid postsecondary educators in implementing Universal Design for Learning. Currently, Sam works on the National Center on Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) focusing on postsecondary and workforce take up of AEM. Sam is also a co-principal investigator for a National Science Foundation study on stereotype threat and its impact on inquiry science pedagogy in middle schools. The project will create a prototype web-based professional development course to help middle-school science teachers understand stereotype threat and use UDL to reduce its effects in everyday instruction. Sam’s primary research focus is on the use of networked technology to support peer-to-peer knowledge transfer and she has conducted design-based research in both professional development and formal education settings. Before joining CAST, Sam was a Senior Associate and Distance Educator at the Center for Social Innovation, leading the company’s online learning strategy.  Sam holds a BA from McGill University and a masters degree and doctorate in education from Harvard.

Show Notes

Would you like to incorporate this episode of "Research in Action" into your course? Download the Episode 46 Instructor Guide (.docx) or visit our Podcast Instructor Guides page to find additional information and past episode guides.

Segment 1: Design-based Research [00:00-10:17]

In this first segment, Sam offers a definition of design-based research.

Segment 2: Examples of Design-based Research [10:18-18:32]

In segment two, Sam shares some examples of designed-based research based on her work with CAST.

Segment 3: Working with Vendors on Research Projects [18:32-29:32]

In segment three, Sam discusses some of the benefits and challenges of collaborating with vendors on academic research.

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:10]: Basic vs. Applied Research

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-04:26]: Expanding Design-based Research into Higher Education

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 6, 2017

On this episode, I am joined by three faculty members from Suffolk University:

Dr. Monika Raesch is Associate Professor and Chair in the Communication and Journalism Department at Suffolk University. She is a native of Germany and holds degrees from four different countries, implying her passion for foreign cultures and film. Dr. Raesch has published articles and book chapters on subject matters in film theory and history and teaching pedagogy in video production, and scholarship. She has also published one monograph and is in the process of editing a book on German filmmaker Margarethe von Trotta.

Dr. Frank Rudy Cooper is a productive scholar known for work in Critical Race Theory, Masculinities Studies, and Criminal Procedure.  Cooper co-edited the book, Masculinities and the Law: A Multidimensional Approach (NYU Press 2012).  He is currently writing a book, Overcoming Cop Macho: How Masculinity Aggravates Racial Profiling.  Cooper is also a highly rated teacher of Race, Gender & Law, Constitutional Law, Criminal Procedure, and Criminal Law.  His service has included a term as Suffolk University President Margaret McKenna's Senior Advisor for Diversity, chairing the Tenure, Teaching, and Scholarship committees, and leadership roles on the Boards of several national law professor organizations. In Spring 2017, Cooper will be a visitor at Boston College Law School.

Patricia A. Reeve is Chair and Associate Professor of History at Suffolk University. Her research and teaching focuses on the history of masculinities, work and workers, and medicine in the nineteenth-century U.S. She also researches the teaching and assessment of information literacy at the college level. Additionally, Pat to designs and delivers professional development educational programs for K-12 social studies/history teachers. Recent publications include "The 'Bone and Sinew of the Nation': Antebellum Workingmen on Health and Sovereignty" in Light, Brookes and Mitchinson (eds.), Bodily Subjects: Essays on Gender and Health, 1800 - 2000. McGill-Queen's University Press, 2015, 25-52.

Would you like to incorporate this episode of "Research in Action" into your course? Download the Episode 45 Instructor Guide (.docx) or visit our Podcast Instructor Guides page to find additional information and past episode guides.

PART 2 – Support Structures for Writing & Writing as Administrators

Segment 1: Administrator Writing Group Experiences [00:00-17:18]

In this first segment, Monika, Pat, and Frank discuss their experience of engaging in an academic writing group.

Segment 2: Self-reflective Practices for Administrative Teacher-scholars [17:19-35:46]

In segment two, Pat, Frank and Monika share some concrete examples of their own self-reflective practices.

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 6, 2017

Take a listen to our February 2017 preview clips and find out about our one-year anniversary plans!

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

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