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Research in Action

Research in Action is a weekly podcast about topics and issues related to research in higher education from experts across a range of disciplines. Episodes are posted weekly and include guest interviews and occasional solo episodes. Guests are from a range of higher education institutions and share their expertise on qualitative, quantitative, and mixed methods as well as their personal experiences as researchers; research and writing practices; organizational and productivity strategies; and much more. Some weeks, bonus content is also posted. Research in Action is hosted by Dr. Katie Linder, the research director for Oregon State University Ecampus. Show notes with information regarding topics discussed in each episode, as well as the transcript for each episode, can be found at the Research in Action website at ecampus.oregonstate.edu/podcast. There are several ways to connect with the Research in Action podcast. Visit ecampus.oregonstate.edu/podcast to post a comment about a specific episode, suggest a future guest, or ask a question that could be featured in a future episode. You can also offer feedback about Research in Action episodes or share research-related resources by contacting the podcast via Twitter @RIA_podcast using the hashtag #ria_podcast or emailing riapodcast@oregonstate.edu. Finally, you can call the Research in Action voicemail line at 541-737-1111 to ask a question or leave a comment. The Research in Action podcast is a resource funded by Oregon State University Ecampus – ranked one of the nation’s best providers of online education with more than 40 degree programs and over 1,000 classes online. Learn more about Ecampus by visiting ecampus.oregonstate.edu. This podcast is produced by the Ecampus Multimedia team.
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Now displaying: Page 2
Apr 21, 2017

On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Kyle Niemeyer, an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering in the School of Mechanical, Industrial, and Manufacturing Engineering at Oregon State University. His research focuses on developing new computational tools to better simulate important physical phenomena, including combustion, turbulence-chemistry interactions, and fluid dynamics. Kyle is also an advocate for open science and reproducibility in computational science.

Segment 1: Growing a Research Pipeline [00:00-12:27]

In this first segment, Kyle shares about his current research and how it influences future projects.

Segment 2: Open Science [12:28-23:07]

In segment two, Kyle discusses his passion for open science.

Segment 3: Being a Journal Editor [23:08-34:19]

In segment three, Kyle shares about his experience as an editor with several open science journals.

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:35]: Perceived Drawbacks of Open Science

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-02:26]: Dr. Kyle Niemeyer’s Podcasting Experience

Bonus Clip #3 [00:00-04:26]: Standardizing Data and Software Citations

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Apr 17, 2017

On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Sarah Carver Williams, the Director of the STEPP Program, a student support program at East Carolina University designed to provide college access and ongoing support for students with learning disabilities. She also serves as Principal Investigator for the College STAR initiative, a grant-funded project focused on helping participating campuses create educational environments that are welcoming for students who have different approaches to learning. Prior to her work with STEPP and College STAR, Sarah was a part of the ECU College of Education faculty and a middle school special education teacher in North Carolina. Sarah received her Bachelor of Science and Master's degree in Special Education from East Carolina University and her PhD in Curriculum and Instruction from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.

Segment 1: College STAR [00:00-11:19]

In this first segment, Sarah discusses the College STAR program.

Segment 2: Starting a Significant Research Endeavor [11:20-21:26]

In segment two, Sarah shares her suggestions for launching a large research project.

Segment 3: Future Developments for College STAR [21:27-31:05]

In segment three, Sarah share the next steps for the College STAR program and how other institutions can get involved.

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Apr 10, 2017

On this episode, Katie celebrates the 1-year anniversary of the "Research in Action" podcast by sharing some metrics from the first year of the show along with feedback from listeners. Katie also chats with some of the behind-the-scenes members of the RIA podcast production team.

Segment 1: "Research in Action" One-year Metrics [00:00-06:48]

In this first segment, Katie shares some of the podcast metrics from the first year.

Segment 2: Feedback from "Research in Action" Listeners [06:49-13:49]

In segment two, Katie shares favorite episodes recommended by RIA listeners.

Segment 3: A Peek Behind the Scenes [13:50-41:46]

In segment three, Katie interviews three members of the Ecampus staff who assist with RIA production.

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Apr 10, 2017

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-3:16]: Dr. Pacheco-Vega's Work on Advancing Environmental Global Governance

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Apr 10, 2017

On this episode, Katie is joined by Dr. Raul Pacheco-Vega, an Assistant Professor in the Public Administration Division of the Center for Economic Teaching and Research (Centro de Investigacion y Docencia Economicas, CIDE) in Mexico. He is a specialist in comparative public policy and focuses on North American environmental politics, primarily sanitation and water governance, solid waste management, neoinstitutional theory, transnational environmental social movements and experimental methods in public policy. His current research programme focuses on the spatial, political and human dimensions of public service delivery. He is also Associate Editor of the Journal of Environmental Studies and Sciences (JESS), and sits on the editorial board of Water International, Global Environmental Politics and several other journals. He is the creator of the weekly hashtag #ScholarSunday.

Segment 1: The Global Politics of Sanitation [00:00-12:01]

In this first segment, Raul shares about some of his research on the global politics of sanitation.

Segment 2: Being an Actively Engaged Researcher [12:02-21:39]

In segment two, Raul shares some of his strategies for being active at conferences and on social media.

Segment 3: Working with Vulnerable Research Populations [21:40-35:01]

In segment three, Raul shares his thoughts on the responsibilities of the researcher when working with vulnerable communities.

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-3:16]: Dr. Pacheco-Vega's Work on Advancing Environmental Global Governance

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 31, 2017

Take a listen to our April 2017 preview clips!

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 31, 2017

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-04:47]: Grant Funded Community College Programs for Training in Research Methods

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 31, 2017

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-02:57]: Resources for Teaching Research Methods

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 31, 2017

On this episode, Katie is joined by two guests:

Dr. Candice Foley, who serves as the STEM Coordinator for all Suffolk County Community College NSF STEM Scholars on three campuses and the Principal Investigator for SCCC’s two consecutive National Science Foundation STEM scholarship grants, the National Institute of Health Institutional Research and Career Development Award grant, and the Long Island Community Foundation Removing Barriers and Strengthening STEM capacity at Suffolk County Community Colleges grants. Dr. Foley has also served on national grant projects involving curricular reform for chemistry education. Her experiences at the State University of New York at Stony Brook, Suffolk County Community College, and Brookhaven National Laboratory has enabled her to focus upon the adaptation and implementation of innovations in classroom learning and undergraduate research through curricular innovation and technology based software for the community college application. Candice has over 25 years of experience in both the research and teaching communities on Long Island and endeavors to bring her perspectives of each of these realms to her STEM students at Suffolk County Community College.

Nina Leonhardt is the Associate Dean for Continuing Education at Suffolk County Community College. Nina oversees a compendium of STEM-oriented programs for pre-college and college students. Most of these programs are funded by NEW York State Education, Labor and Health departments. Nina has over 35 years of experience in higher education and STEM. She earned an M.S. In Electrical Sciences from Stony Brook University.

Segment 1: Teaching Research Methods [00:00-10:38]

In this first segment, Candice and Nina share their philosophies for teaching research methods.

Segment 2: Teaching Research Methods in a Community College Setting [10:39-19:32]

In segment two, Nina and Candice discuss teaching research methods to community college students.

Segment 3: Teaching Research Methods Online [19:33-31:58]

In segment three, Candice and Nina share about the online research methods course they developed for off-site students.

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-02:57]: Resources for Teaching Research Methods

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-04:47]: Grant Funded Community College Programs for Training in Research Methods

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 27, 2017

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:16]: Example of a Shy Researcher Engaging with the Media

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 27, 2017

On this episode, I am joined by Kevin Anselmo, the Founder and Principal of Experiential Communications. He helps individuals and groups gain clarity about what to communicate and then works with his clients to disseminate those messages to ensure they are aligned to big-picture goals. His services focus on communications strategy development, media training, PR execution, coaching, workshops and events, primarily for the higher education, research and entrepreneurial communities. He is the author of Maximize Your Impact: How Academics Can Communicate Knowledge Through Traditional and Digital Media. Previously, Kevin was Director of Public Relations for Duke University's Fuqua School of Business and prior to that managed the media relations for IMD in Switzerland. Currently based in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, Kevin lived and worked in Switzerland for eight years and in Germany for two years. He has led public relations initiatives in various countries around the world.

Segment 1: Four Ways to Think About Public Relations [00:00-15:52]

In this first segment, Kevin shares four areas that researchers should consider regarding publicizing their work.

Segment 2: Preparing for Interviews [15:53-34:28]

In segment two, Kevin shares some concrete steps researchers can take to prepare for print and on-camera interviews.

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:16]: Example of a Shy Researcher Engaging with the Media

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 20, 2017

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:17]: Creating Your Own Luck with Research

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 20, 2017

On this episode, I am joined by Sara Goldrick-Rab, the author of Paying the Price, and the coauthor of Reinventing Financial Aid: Charting a New Course to College Affordability. She has written on education issues for the New York Times, the Chronicle of Higher Education, and other publications. Goldrick-Rab is currently a Professor of Higher Education Policy and Sociology at Temple University in Philadelphia, and is a former professor of higher education policy and sociology at the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  She is the founding director of the Wisconsin HOPE Lab, the nation’s first laboratory aimed at improving equitable outcomes in postsecondary education. The Chronicle of Higher Education recently named her Twitter account (@saragoldrickrab) the most indispensable one to follow.

Segment 1: Study Logistics of Paying the Price [00:00-10:47]

In this first segment, Sara describes the research discussed in her book Paying the Price.

Segment 2: Media Attention for Paying the Price [10:48-20:52]

In segment two, Sara discusses some of the media attention she received in response to Paying the Price.

Segment 3: The Costs of Media Attention [20:53-36:09]

In segment three, Sarah shares some of the benefits and challenges of working with a range of media outlets.

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:17]: Creating Your Own Luck with Research

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 13, 2017

On this episode, I am joined by Dr. Chris Goldfinger, Professor of Geology and Geophysics at Oregon State University. Chris’s research interests include subduction earthquakes; mechanics of oblique subduction, accretion and erosion of active margins; seafloor imaging, mapping, and visualization techniques; and seafloor drilling technology. His current work focuses on the investigation of the earthquake potential global subduction zones, including Sumatra, Japan and particularly the Cascadia subduction zone. Chris has been widely quoted by the media for his research, perhaps most noticeably in a 2015 New Yorker article called, “The Really Big One” about the potential fallout of a massive Cascadia earthquake.

Segment 1: Cascadia Research [00:00-10:55]

In this first segment, Chris shares about his research regarding the Cascadia subduction zone.

Segment 2: Media Attention [10:56-21:39]

In segment two, Chris shares about the media attention his research received after a New Yorker article went viral.

Segment 3: Earthquake Preparedness [21:40-35:18]

In segment three, Chris shares about his work educating the general public about earthquake preparedness.

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 3, 2017

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-03:53]: Benefits of Setting "Tripwires" in Your Professional Life

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 3, 2017

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-07:37]: Finding and Working with a Literary Agent

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 3, 2017

On this episode, I am joined by Dr. Therese Huston, who is looking to change how we see women as decision-makers.  The New York Times calls her book, "How Women Decide," “required reading on Wall Street.” Therese is a cognitive scientist at Seattle University, where she helps intelligent people make smart choices.  She’s written for the New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Harvard Business Review and The Guardian, and her work has been featured on NPR. In October 2016, Therese gave her first TEDx talk on women and decision-making.  Harvard University Press published Therese’s first book, Teaching What You Don't Know, which won a Book of the Year Award in Education from Foreword Literary Reviews.

Therese received her BA from Carleton College, a B.S. and PhD in Cognitive Psychology from Carnegie Mellon University, and completed a post-doctoral fellowship with the Center for the Neural Basis of Cognition at the University of Pittsburgh.  She founded the Center for Excellence in Teaching and Learning at Seattle University. When she’s not writing, she loves to travel, play with numbers, spend time with her husband and dog, and bake amazing gluten-free chocolate cake.

Show Notes

Segment 1: How Women Decide [00:00-14:01]

In this first segment, Therese shares about how her book How Women Decide came to be.

Segment 2: How Women Decide for Higher Ed [14:02-23:39]

In segment two, Therese shares some of the strategies from How Women Decide that can be applied to higher education.

Segment 3: The Complexities of Looking at Gender Issues [23:40-35:07]

In segment three, Therese shares about transitioning to a new research area of studying gender in mid-career.

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-07:37]: Finding and Working with a Literary Agent

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-03:53]: Benefits of Setting "Tripwires" in Your Professional Life

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Mar 3, 2017

This month on the "Research in Action" podcast, we have some great episodes that we're excited to share with you.

In celebration of our one-year anniversary coming up in April, this month we're offering our first set of "themed" episodes that are all discussing different aspects of how researchers can interact with the media. You'll hear about preparing for television interviews, working with publicists and literary agents, and juggling media attention with the work of being a researcher.

Enjoy!

Show Notes

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 24, 2017

On this episode, I am joined by Dr. Laurie Juranek, an Assistant Professor in the College of Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences at Oregon State University. Dr. Juranek studies what the chemistry of seawater tells us about life and death in the ocean. Her research takes her from the warm, aquamarine waters off of Hawaii to the ice-covered Arctic Ocean. When not doing science, she enjoys vegetable gardening, cooking, and weightlifting.

Show Notes

Segment 1: Life and Death in the Ocean [00:00-10:09]

In this first segment, Laurie describes the research questions she explores in her study of life and death in the ocean.

Segment 2: Logistics of Researching in the Field [10:10-22:17]

In segment two, Laurie shares some of the logistics of her research in the arctic.

Segment 3: Broader Impacts of Researching in the Arctic [22:18-33:25]

In segment three, Laurie discusses some of the ways she frames the broader impacts of her research, particularly for grant applications.

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 20, 2017

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-06:39]: The Four Aces for Projecting Confidence

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 20, 2017

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-02:48]: Tips for Presenting to Non-scientists

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 20, 2017

On this episode, I am joined by Michael Alley. Holding a master of science in electrical engineering and a master of fine arts in writing, Michael Alley is an associate professor of engineering communication at Penn State.  He is the author of The Craft of Scientific Presentations (Springer, 2013), which has been translated into Japanese and Chinese. Over the past decade, he has taught presentations to scientists and engineers on four continents, in sixteen countries, and at more than 150 institutions. He has presented at Google, MIT, Harvard Medical School, Texas Instruments, Simula Research Laboratory (Norway), Shanghai Jiao Tong University, and the European Space Organization in the high desert of Chile. Alley’s websites on presentations are top Google listings for the topics of "engineering presentations" and "scientific presentations".

Transcript (.docx)

Show Notes

Would you like to incorporate this episode of "Research in Action" into your course? Download the Episode 47 Instructor Guide (.docx) or visit our Podcast Instructor Guides page to find additional information and past episode guides.

Segment 1: Best Practices for Scientific Presentations [00:00-09:35]

In this first segment, Michael shares some of what he has learned about making effective research presentations.

Segment 2: Investigations on Confidence in Speaking [09:36-16:25]

In segment two, Michael discusses how researchers can be more confident as presenters.

Segment 3: Rethinking the Way We Use PowerPoint [16:26-30:55]

In segment three, Michael shares some of his thoughts on PowerPoint and best practices for using the tool.

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-02:48]: Tips for Presenting to Non-scientists

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-06:39]: The Four Aces for Projecting Confidence

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 13, 2017

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-04:26]: Expanding Design-based Research into Higher Education

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 13, 2017

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:10]: Basic vs. Applied Research

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

Feb 13, 2017

On this episode, I am joined by Dr. Sam Johnston, a research scientist with The Center for Applied Special Technology, or CAST. With support of the Gates Foundation’s Open Professionals Education Network, she recently led the development of UDL On Campus—a collection of online resources to aid postsecondary educators in implementing Universal Design for Learning. Currently, Sam works on the National Center on Accessible Educational Materials (AEM) focusing on postsecondary and workforce take up of AEM. Sam is also a co-principal investigator for a National Science Foundation study on stereotype threat and its impact on inquiry science pedagogy in middle schools. The project will create a prototype web-based professional development course to help middle-school science teachers understand stereotype threat and use UDL to reduce its effects in everyday instruction. Sam’s primary research focus is on the use of networked technology to support peer-to-peer knowledge transfer and she has conducted design-based research in both professional development and formal education settings. Before joining CAST, Sam was a Senior Associate and Distance Educator at the Center for Social Innovation, leading the company’s online learning strategy.  Sam holds a BA from McGill University and a masters degree and doctorate in education from Harvard.

Show Notes

Would you like to incorporate this episode of "Research in Action" into your course? Download the Episode 46 Instructor Guide (.docx) or visit our Podcast Instructor Guides page to find additional information and past episode guides.

Segment 1: Design-based Research [00:00-10:17]

In this first segment, Sam offers a definition of design-based research.

Segment 2: Examples of Design-based Research [10:18-18:32]

In segment two, Sam shares some examples of designed-based research based on her work with CAST.

Segment 3: Working with Vendors on Research Projects [18:32-29:32]

In segment three, Sam discusses some of the benefits and challenges of collaborating with vendors on academic research.

Bonus Clip #1 [00:00-04:10]: Basic vs. Applied Research

Bonus Clip #2 [00:00-04:26]: Expanding Design-based Research into Higher Education

To share feedback about this podcast episode, ask questions that could be featured in a future episode, or to share research-related resources, contact the “Research in Action” podcast:

Twitter: @RIA_podcast or #RIA_podcast

Email: riapodcast@oregonstate.edu

Voicemail: 541-737-1111

If you listen to the podcast via iTunes, please consider leaving us a review.

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